Responses

Yes. Google will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google if they have a good-faith belief that access, use, preservation or disclosure of the information is reasonably necessary to: meet any applicable law, regulation, legal process or enforceable governmental request; enforce applicable Terms of Service, including investigation of potential violations; detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues; or protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google, our users or the public as required or permitted by law.

Yes. PII is provided to authorities when required by law or in response to their requests.

Yes. Facebook may access, preserve and share users information in response to a legal request (like a search warrant, court order or subpoena): if they have a good faith belief that the law requires them to do so; if it is necessary to detect, prevent and address fraud and other illegal activity; if they need to protect Facebook, users and others, including as part of investigations; and if the information would prevent death or imminent bodily harm.

Yes. Yahoo! “responds to disclosure demands if permitted or required by law including responding to warrants, subpoenas, court orders, or other legal process, or to establish or exercise our legal rights or defend against legal claims”.

Yes. The company discloses information if necessary to comply with laws, enforce Foursquare’s conditions, or to protect property and safety of employees or users.

Yes. Google will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google if they have a good-faith belief that access, use, preservation or disclosure of the information is reasonably necessary to: meet any applicable law, regulation, legal process or enforceable governmental request; enforce applicable Terms of Service, including investigation of potential violations; detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues; or protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google, our users or the public as required or permitted by law.

Yes. “We may access, preserve and share your information in response to a legal request (like a search warrant, court order or subpoena) if we have a good faith belief that the law requires us to do so. This may include responding to legal requests from jurisdictions outside of the United States where we have a good faith belief that the response is required by law in that jurisdiction, affects users in that jurisdiction, and is consistent with internationally recognized standards.”

Yes. It is possible that LinkedIn may need to disclose personal information, profile information and/or information about user’s activities when required by subpoena or other legal process, or if LinkedIn has a good faith belief that disclosure is necessary to: investigate, prevent or take action regarding suspected or actual illegal activities or to assist government enforcement agencies; investigate and defend LinkedIn against any third party claims or allegations, or to protect the security or integrity of the site; or to exercise or protect the rights, property or personal safety of LinkedIn, users, employees, or others.

Yes. LiveJournal may share PII with US Law enforcement officers to “investigate, prevent, or take action to prevent or stop illegal activities, suspected fraud, situations involving potential threats to the physical safety of any person, violations of LiveJournal’s [Terms Of Service], and/or if it is necessary to comply with, and/or cure a potential violation or breach of, U.S. law.”

Yes. Meetup may disclose PII when required by law, or if they have good-faith belief that such action is necessary to comply with a judicial proceeding, a court order or legal process, enforce the Terms of Service, respond to claims that your PII violates the rights of third parties, or protect the rights, property or personal safety of Meetup, its members and the public.

Yes. Information may be disclosed to protect or defend MySpace, its affiliates and employees; to ensure the safety of other users, fraud and risk management; or to comply with legal processes.

Yes. Nexopia “will fully cooperate with any request to release information to any law enforcement agency when a proper request is received.” (Including subpoena, and search warrants).

Yes. “It may be necessary – by law, legal process, litigation, and/or requests from public and governmental authorities within or outside your country of residence – for Apple to disclose your personal information. We may also disclose information about you if we determine that for purposes of national security, law enforcement, or other issues of public importance, disclosure is necessary or appropriate.”

Yes. The company will disclose information to authorities if doing so is considered necessary for legal compliance or request, protecting safety of users or employees, prevention of fraud.

Yes. Plenty of Fish may disclose information as permitted or required by law. The company may also be compelled to release information by a court of law or other person or entity with jurisdiction to compel production of such information.

If Plenty of Fish has reasonable grounds to believe information could be useful in the investigation of improper or unlawful activity, they may disclose information to law enforcement agencies or other appropriate bodies.

Yes. Reddit may provide access to their database in order to cooperate with official investigations or legal proceedings, including, for example, in response to subpoenas, search warrants, court orders, or other legal process.

Yes. Tumblr reserves the right to access, preserve, and disclose any information as they reasonably believe is necessary, in their sole discretion, to satisfy any law, regulation, legal process, governmental request, or governmental order.

Yes. Twitter may preserve or disclose user information if they believe that it is necessary to comply with a law, regulation or legal request. Nothing in Twitter’s Privacy Policy is intended to limit any legal defenses or objections user may have to a third party’s, including a government’s, request to disclose their information.

Yes. “Occasionally, the Foundation may receive a subpoena or other compulsory request from a law-enforcement agency or a court or equivalent government body that requests the disclosure of information about a registered user, and may be compelled by law to comply with the request.”In the event of “such a legally compulsory request, the Foundation will attempt to notify the affected user within three business days after the arrival of such subpoena by sending a notice by email to the email address (if any) that the affected user has listed in his or her user preferences.”

“The Foundation does note… that such users may have the legal right to resist or limit that information in court by filing a motion to quash the subpoena…. If the Foundation receives a court-filed motion to quash or otherwise limit the subpoena as a result of action by a user or their lawyer, the Foundation will not disclose the requested information until Wikimedia receives an order from the court to do so.”

Yes. Automattic discloses potentially PII and PII in response to a subpoena, court order or other governmental request.

Yes. WordPress.org discloses potentially PII and PII when required to do so by law.

Yes. Blizzard reserves the right to disclose PII as required by law, and if they have a good faith belief that it is necessary to prevent fraud or other illegal activities.

Yes. Google will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google if they have a good-faith belief that access, use, preservation or disclosure of the information is reasonably necessary to:

  • Meet any applicable law, regulation, legal process or enforceable governmental request. Information may also be shared to enforce applicable Terms of Service, including investigation of potential violations.
  • Personal information may also be disclosed in the event of detecting, preventing, or otherwise addressing fraud, security or technical issues.
  • Finally, the company reserves the right to disclose PI to protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google, our users or the public as required or permitted by law.

Yes. Zynga may disclose user’s information when they have a good faith belief that they are required to disclose the information in response to legal process (e.g. court order, search warrant or subpoena); to satisfy any applicable laws or regulations; or when they believe that the Service is being used in the commission of a crime, including to report such criminal activity or to exchange information with other companies and organizations for the purposes of fraud protection and credit risk reduction.